Delicious Pregnancy Green Smoothie

Leafy green foods and protein should be two very important aspects of a pregnant person’s diet; however, during pregnancy, it can be difficult to incorporate all the nutritious foods our bodies need every day. Not only do many people experience food aversions and have little to no appetite in the first trimester, you may also be low on energy and not entirely motivated to plan out well balanced meals. Combine that with the fact that the majority of us live incredibly busy lives that don’t allow for a lot of extra time to cook each meal from scratch and it can be a recipe for unpleasant and unwanted health problems. Enter this delicious green smoothie recipe that doesn’t taste like freshly mowed lawn clippings. Bonus: you don’t have to be pregnant to enjoy it!

IMG_7630.JPG

I will be the first to admit that if you want to stay fuller longer, its best to eat your greens instead of blending them up to drink them, but if you find yourself struggling to meet the recommended daily intake for vegetables or protein, this green smoothie can help tremendously. The nutritional benefits are still abundant and here’s why:

Kale
Kale is low in calories but high in fiber, vitamins A, C, and K, and calcium. Fiber can improve the dreaded pregnancy constipation. Vitamins A and C are important for a well-functioning immune system, that is generally weaker during pregnancy. Vitamin K strengthens your blood vessels, which is necessary when your blood volume increases.

Spinach
Also low in calories, spinach is rich in folate and iron. Folate is an essential nutrient in pregnancy because it can prevent certain birth defects and decrease your chances of premature labor. Iron can help prevent anemia, which is common during pregnancy. Spinach also contains calcium which is important for you and your growing baby’s bones.

Cucumber
Not only does cucumber greatly improve the taste of this green smoothie, it’s made up of 95% water, as well as magnesium and potassium. All three of these work together to keep you well hydrated. Cucumbers also contain several antioxidants, which have a variety of benefits relating to organ function, disease prevention, and your overall health.

Avocado
Just like many of the above green foods, avocado is high in Vitamin K, folate, Vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. What makes it unique compared to the other ingredients is it’s high fat content. This type of “healthy fat” is shown to reduce inflammation and lower cholesterol. It’s a key ingredient to this smoothie recipe because it’s going to help keep you feeling full and satisfied longer.

Mango
Mango adds a touch of sweetness to the recipe, but it won’t spike your blood sugar levels because of its low glycemic index. The enzymes in the fruit help to improve digestion.

Coconut Water
Coconut water is another excellent way to ensure hydration and prevent constipation. It can also help treat heartburn because it neutralizes acid in the body. It’s preferable to using juice in a smoothie because it is lower in sugar.

Lemon Juice
The lemon in this recipe really helps to neutralize the bitterness of the leafy greens without adding a noticeable sour taste to the drink. Lemons are powerful detoxifiers and promote a healthy immune system.

Protein Powder
In pregnancy, experts recommend 75 to 100 grams of protein a day. Protein is essential for fetal brain development. Any type of protein powder should be fine for this purpose, but if you don’t already have a specific brand you’re partial to, Rainbow Light makes a great plant-based, vegan protein powder formulated for pregnancy and postpartum.

IMG_7631.JPG

Recipe
Yield: 2 Servings
Serving Size: 8-10 ounces

1 cup kale, packed
1 cup baby spinach, packed
1/2 cucumber, sliced
1/2 avocado
1/2 cup frozen mango
1 cup coconut water
1/2 lemon, juiced
2 scoops of protein powder (optional)

Put the ingredients in your blender in the order they’re listed and blend until smooth! This recipe makes two 8-10 ounce servings, so you can share the other portion with your partner or children or you can save it in the refrigerator for yourself for the following day. It still tastes delicious, just make sure you stir it first, in case the protein powder settles.

IMG_7629

Pregnancy can be extremely depleting on the body. It’s crucial that we care for ourselves so we’re functioning at our best. Eating well by incorporating green foods and protein is a great way to help us thrive in pregnancy, postpartum, and parenthood.

Alexandra Bravo LMT, CLC
Owner, Bravo Birth DFW

Early Labor | What I Wish I Knew

Welcome to part three of our blog series entitled What I Wish I Knew. This series explores various topics related to pregnancy, birth, postpartum, and parenting that parents wish they would have known more about before they experienced them. You can find part one here and part two here. Our first two installments of this series addressed common postpartum issues, but today we’ll be addressing birth, more specifically early labor. When we asked our doula clients and social media followers about what they wished they would have known more about before going through labor, many parents expressed their uncertainty in knowing how to identify early labor signs, as well as what they should do when it begins.

What is Early Labor?
Early labor is the first stage in the labor process, during which your cervix begins changing. It is also sometimes referred to as pre-labor, or the latent phase. During pregnancy, a normal cervix is firm, closed, long, and pointing toward your back (posterior). In early labor, the cervix begins to soften (ripen), open (dilate), thin (efface), and move forward toward the birth canal. This begins to occur through a complex series of chemical and hormonal changes in the body. Early labor is defined as the period of time that your cervix is between 0-3 cm dilated. It is generally the longest and least physically demanding stage of labor.
Uterine-Cervical-Prolapse-During-Pregnancy.jpg

How Do I Know if I’m in Early Labor?
Oftentimes, early labor is so mild that you may not even notice it. Other times, you may experience some of the following symptoms:

• Menstrual-like cramps
• Low back ache
• Increased pressure in pelvis or vagina
• Fluid leakage from vagina
• Inconsistent contractions or contractions 10 or more minutes apart
• Increased vaginal discharge
• Bloody show
• Loss of mucous plug
• Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea

If you think your water has broken, notice more bleeding than light spotting, experience severe pain, or a decrease in fetal movement, be sure to contact your healthcare provider.

What Should I Do in Early Labor?
Birth is often likened to a marathon. In a marathon, you want to avoid exerting all of your energy at the very beginning, so you will have the stamina to make it through until the end. The same is true for birth. If your mind and body become too fatigued early on, labor may become more difficult than necessary. So if birth is a marathon, rather than thinking of early labor as the beginning of the race, it may be helpful to think of early labor as the day or two leading up to the race. You will want to hydrate, eat well, rest as much as possible, and go about your life as usual. Don’t get caught up in the idea that you have to do anything to get active labor to begin. The time for that may come later on, but this is likely the only stage of labor that you’ll have the opportunity to rest comfortably through, so be sure to take advantage of that as much as possible. Although the thought of finally being done with the discomforts of late pregnancy and meeting your baby may be exciting, try to avoid doing too much physical activity which could exhaust you before the more strenuous work needs to be done.

In a high-risk or special circumstance pregnancy, you will want to discuss with your provider during your pregnancy what you should do in early labor. Some conditions may necessitate monitoring or intervention.

Doulas and Early Labor
If you have hired a birth doula, it may be a good idea to touch base with them during early labor. Although you likely will not need them to come to you right away, your doula can still be of importance during this time. They can help you differentiate between early and active labor, offer support and encouragement, and answer any questions for you. Communicating with your doula also allows them to begin to prepare themselves to be with you in a timely manner when you request them further along in labor.